Tag Archives: Middelheim museum

About yesterday, July 21st, 2013

Blimey, it is blistering.
Hot in my apartment.
Hot outside.
Hot everywhere.
33°C (some 90°F) today and there is no wind, not even the slightest of breezes.

I didn’t sleep very well last night as my bedroom felt like an oven. The windows were open but then I hear the yelling of the tipsy youngsters or the agonizing cries of the drunk on the street as if they are standing next to my bed.

I’m sweating abundantly and I feel sticky yet sensual and hot.
Little A. is to the hairdresser and at noon Princess came by for lunch.

Yesterday, July 21st, Princess and Me had an afternoon to us and I took her to the Middelheim Museum in Antwerp a 30 hectares park.
Copied from their very informative website:

The Middelheim Museum collection contains approximately 400 works of art collected up over a period of more than 50 years. Works date from around 1900 to the present, and as a collection they provide an excellent overview of international modern and contemporary art.
Every year sees new works added to the collection. Around 215 sculptures have been placed in the park, including works by major artists such as Auguste Rodin, Rik Wouters, Henry Moore, Juan Muñoz, Carl Andre, Panamarenko, Franz West, Erwin Wurm and many others. Stately trees, broad paths and inviting grassy clearings complete the vista.”

Two ladies

In Brussels King Albert 2 had already abdicated in favor of his son, now King Philippe, during this extremely warm National Holiday. I could imagine the Military defile greeting the new King while fighter planes fly over the royal palace displaying the national colors.

Princess and I had a wonderful afternoon enjoying the art on display and the cool under the trees. We talked and kissed and laughed and felt happy and ever so carefree.
On a terrace in the shadow we enjoyed a beer and talked some more, holding hands and losing ourselves in each other’s eyes.

Product of an Antwerp brewery

Time passes so quickly and soon, much to soon it was time to drive her home.

I kissed my Princess, said goodbye and whispered how much I love her, my heart, my soul, me, belonging to her forever and one day.

There is not a single day that passes without me praising Someone because Princess is in my life.

Firmament with Princess and I

Princess is without any doubt ma raison d’être.
I love you, Princess, unconditionally.

Bricks

It was one of those hectic weekends where I drove around as a madman, making sure Big A. was on time in Antwerp where she was a hostess on a fair, a school project, and trying to be on time to fetch her later on. In between I picked up The Eldest One and The Baby and drove them to Princess.

That Saturday, February 23rd, it was freezing cold and in the early afternoon I dropped The Eldest One and The Baby at their mother/baby unit and drove further to Antwerp, stopped on the way at a McDonald’s and parked an hour later near the Middelheim Museum.

Like I said, it was freezing cold but I was dressed for it. I enjoyed the walk, made a zillion photographs with my Olympus E-PM1 and found the work of Per Kirkeby. It is just a building, impressive and huge, made with bare bricks and with multiple door openings.
It inspired me.

Bricks I

While strolling around with a Lumix 14mm prime lens on my Olympus, I made a few images that represented in a way my state of mind.
Princess and I discovered and enjoyed bdsm, mostly the SM part and we still do now and then and we miss this kind of playing.
I am more and more tender while making love to Princess and she likes it very much and yet she misses the rough play too.

What has changed as we miss the mix of pain and pleasure but enjoy the desire of making love in a very affectionate way?

Bricks II

I think I know why and I have been trying to write about this almost unnoticeable and positive shift in our relationship. Haven’t posted it yet because I’m not happy with the way I’m telling the story. Still polishing.

It has to do with The Eldest One and The Baby and the positive impact on our relation, Princess and I.

Bricks III